Medicinal Herbs

Painkillers and Pharmacies will not be around the corner when the ZOMBIES strike. So I started to search which herbs we can use instead of pills. Here we go.

HERBAL EXTRACTS

Herbal tinctures and extracts are the preferred form of medicine as they are assimilated quickly and administered easily. Tincturing also extracts valuable constituents not found in teas since certain active plant properties are only soluble in alcohol. If you dislike the alcohol, you can reduce its presence somewhat by placing the drops in a half cup of hot, boiled water and allowing it to sit for 15 minutes. You can also mix the extract with juice to disguise the taste. To keep things in perspective, it has been said there’s more alcohol in a ripe banana than in the suggested dosage of herbal extracts.

Arnica. This external remedy makes a great massage liniment for sore and cramped muscles. It will decrease pain and prevent swelling and bruising associated with torn ligaments, sprains, crushed fingers and toes, and broken bones — provided the skin is not broken. Arnica works best if applied immediately after an injury and continued every couple hours for the first day.

Cayenne. Five to ten drops diluted in two ounces of water can be used internally for frostbite and hypothermia. It moves the blood from the center of the body to the peripheral areas, warming hands and feet. A couple drops under the tongue will help to revive someone in shock or trauma. Used externally for heavily bleeding lacerations, it will coagulate the blood to stanch the flow (though it stings a mite).

Valerian. As an antispasmodic and painkiller, this herb relieves intestinal and menstrual cramps, headaches and general aches or pains. As a nervine, it will bring sleep to an exhausted person. The dosage range is 30 to 60 drops.

 

Echinacea. Besides possessing the ability to increase the supply of white blood cells to an infected area, thus boosting the immune system, Echinacea is also antibiotic and antibacterial to gram positive bacteria such as strep or staph. It’s helpful with fevers, poisoning, or any type of internal infection and has reportedly been used for poisonous insect and snake bites by many native Plains tribes. Echinacea is a good preventative and supportive herb for the onset of the flu or common cold. The dosage ranges from 30 to 60 drops, the higher ranges used for fevers and acute situations. For toothaches, it can be massaged into the surrounding gums and teeth. For poisonous bites, 60 drops every 15 minutes is appropriate.

Grindelia. As an external remedy, grindelia cools and soothes hot, irritated skin rashes, sunburns, itchy insect bites and poison ivy. When taken internally, it helps expel mucus obstruction in the bronchioles and may be useful for some types of asthma and respiratory congestion.


Quassia
. As an antimicrobial, this herb is traditionally used for bacterial diarrhea, dysentery, and giardia — a lower gastrointestinal complaint contracted by drinking contaminated water. The standard dose is three to five droppersful every six hours. To treat suspected bad water, add 30 drops to each quart of water.

 

Advertisements

One response to “Medicinal Herbs

  1. This post is useful! Not just in case of a zombie strike, but also for nowadays life. Considering that pills are getting more, and more expensive, i’ll start using it them from now on.

    Nice post! Go on! Keep posting about plants

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s